Board Bios

DOTAC President

Ted Dodd, Diakonia of The United Church of Canada

After teaching at the Centre for Christian Studies (CCS) for seventeen years, Ted retired in 2015. Prior to joining the staff of CCS, Ted served in various congregational and regional ministries. In 2003, after a special program of study, Ted became the first person in the United Church to switch order of ministry designation from ordained to diaconal. His doctoral work focused on Tranformational Learning and Theological Education.  http://ducc.ca/tag/ted-dodd/

In 2012, Ted was named co-recipient of the Davidson Trust Award for excellence in theological education.  His 2003 Master’s thesis is entitled Diaconal Ministry in the United Church of Canada: Function, Style and Perspective. To view some of his writing on diakonia see:

Also in 2003, he completed a certificate in Conflict Mediation. In 1998, Ted co‑edited Roll Away the Stone: Lenten Reflections at the Close of the Ecumenical Decade in Solidarity with Women.  He also and chaired the national task group preparing  the UCCanada service book, Celebrate God’s Presence

Ted has served on the board since 2017 and he became president of DOTAC in 2018.


Vice-President

Sister Noreen Stevens, The Deaconess Community of the ELCA

Sr. Noreen Stevens’ calls moved her from institutions to congregations before beginning to serve with the Saint Paul Area Synod as the candidacy coordinator in 2001 and then concluding after eight years as an Assistant to the Bishop, when she was called to serve as the Directing Deaconess for the Deaconess Community of the ELCA in November 2016. Rostered as a Minister of Word and Service (Deacon) in the ELCA, her ministries have focused on education, spiritual and vocational discernment, systems, leadership, intensive boundary training, as well as partnership development, advocacy and self-care. Her 32 years of ministry experience have provided opportunities to integrate the practical and academic learning, which has created a toolbox of resources. However, some of the greatest learnings have come from her family’s dinner table where Law (her husband is in law enforcement) and Gospel were woven into their conversation. With one son living in Michigan’s UP and the other in New York City, Noreen and her husband, Doug, have wonderful places to visit and explore museums and art, while their three Old English Bulldogs take care of things at their home. Sister Noreen and Doug have recently moved to a log cabin located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan after many years in the Twin Cities areas of Minnesota.


Treasurer

Lisa Scherzer Polito, Lutheran Diaconal Association/Lutheran Deaconess Conference/Community of Lutheran Deacons

Deaconess Lisa Scherzer Polito serves as the Executive Director of the Lutheran Diaconal Association in Valparaiso, Indiana, USA.   

A graduate of Valparaiso University, she was consecrated as a deaconess in 1990.  Following her consecration, Lisa served Good Shepherd Lutheran Home of the West as the Spiritual Life Coordinator in Southern California from 1990 – 2000.  Lisa returned to the Midwest to serve the LDA as Director of Development and Public Relations in 2001.  She was named Executive Director in 2008.

Lisa loves the opportunity to be a part of DIAKONIA and DOTAC.  She served as the DOTAC president for two terms and has attended every DOTAC gathering since Winnipeg in 2002 and every DIAKONIA Assembly since 1996.

Lisa enjoys reading, baseball, traveling and looking at snow outside her office window.

She is married to Carmine Polito, a professor of civil engineering at Valparaiso University. Lisa grew up in northwestern Minnesota and thinks it is the best place EVER! 


Secretary

Judy Whaley, Secretary – Deacons –Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC Deacons)

Since January 2019, Judy Whaley served in the Secretary position with faithfulness and dedication. We are extremely grateful for her service and energy for DOTAC. She represented the Deacons of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada on the DOTAC Board since 2014. The ELCIC Deacons will be seeking a replacement for Judy from their community. The Board will be sharing the responsibilities of the Secretary — special thanks to Jan Cherry — up to the elections of new officers in November.


Deacon Jan Cherry, second representative to DIAKONIA World Federation – ELCA Deacons Ecumenical Engagement Affinity Group

Jan Cherry, a Deacon in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, served for seven years as the Ecumenical Liturgical Coordinator at the School of Theology & Ministry at Seattle University.  She has served on the Board of Directors of DIAKONIA of the Americas and the Caribbean since 2009, where she served as Treasurer of DOTAC from 2009 – 2017, and as second representative to the DIAKONIA World Federation Executive Committee since 2017. She will retire from these positions at the end of the World Gathering in Darwin, 2021. Currently she serves as the Parish Administrator for an Episcopal Parish in Seattle, Washington as well as Supply Pastor for a small congregation in Everett, Washington.  Serving on Boards is one way she lives out her diaconal call in the world, sitting on the local Synod Council of the ELCA in NW Washington and Open Door Ministries, a ministry to GLBTQ+ people in our synod. She continues to serves in specialized ways with the Church Council of Greater Seattle, and ecumenical organization involved in local  justice advocacy, especially in the area of immigration issues, homelessness and living wages.   In all of these capacities, she has shaped many worship services, ever mindful of the power of the words and language used, and the mandate from Christ that we serve others as Jesus served us.  She is passionate about the need to take a closer look at the hymns and songs we use in assembled worship. 


Rev. Ann Blane, Presbyterian Church in Canada – Order of Diaconal Ministries

Ann Blane spent her formative years in India where her parents were missionaries with The Presbyteiran Church in Canada. She is a member of the Order of Diaconal Ministries and an Ordained Minister within The Presbyterian Church in Canada. For the past 38 years Ann  has served the church in a variety of ministries: Director of Christian Education, in Youth Ministries, Children and Family Ministries, Inner City Mission with Metis and inner city children and youth, Camp Director and Leadership in Training Director, Regional Staff for a Synod and has served with several pastoral charges.  Presently she and her husband Robert live in the cottage community of Bobcaygeon, Ontario where she is the minister at Knox Presbyterian Church.


Jacquie Bouthéon, Association of Anglican Deacons of Canada/Association Anglicane des Diacres au
Canada

Jacquie Bouthéon was born and grew up in England.  Upon graduation from high school, she obtained a job with Lloyds Bank Europe in London; when she turned 21 she was posted to the Geneva office, partly due to her fluency in both French and German. While there she met her husband Adrien; they married in 1970 and emigrated to Canada; they have lived in Toronto ever since. After a few years in banking and insurance, Jacquie has worked as a French-language translator since 1977.

Jacquie has a designation of Fellow of the Life Management Institute. Also, she holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in General History and in Religious Studies from the University of Waterloo (Ontario), a Certificate in Gerontology from Huntington University/Laurentian and a Bachelor of Theology from Thorneloe University.

Jacquie has been an active member of her parish, since 1984, serving in numerous roles.  In 1999, when the Vocational Diaconate was definitively established in the Diocese of Toronto, she was ordained to the diaconate.  She has been an Associate of the Sisterhood of St. John the Divine for over 30 years. From 2003-2018, she served as Clerical Domestic Chaplain to the diocesan bishop.  In recognition of this service Jacquie was made an Honorary Canon of St. James Cathedral in 2017.

Jacquie is Convenor of the local chapter of the International Order of St. Luke the Physician and has been membership secretary of the Association of Anglican Deacons in Canada since its inception in 2000.

When she is not involved in the above activities, Jacquie enjoys reading, doing needlepoint, listening to classical music and solving crossword puzzles.


Rev. Deacon Lori Mills-Curran, Association for Episcopal Deacons

Lori serves as Executive Director of the Association for Episcopal Deacons, the premier organization advocating for and resourcing the 3100 deacons in The Episcopal Church.  She has primary interests in diaconal theology and economic justice issues. 

Lori recently retired as the founding Executive Director of ProGente Connections, a mission hub of Diocese of Massachusetts and an ecumenical partnership which serves a large Brazilian immigrant population through English and introduction to American culture classes, Portuguese classes for children, college and career coaching, citizenship assistance, rights workshops and pandemic relief.  Lori has extensive experience in faith-based community organizing and coached parishes desiring to initiate their own immigrant ministries. 

Lori served two terms on The Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission for Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations.  She currently serves on the bilateral Covenant Committee with the Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil (the Brazilian Episcopal Church). 

In the past, Lori worked as an attorney for the Small Business Administration and for the Rhode Island Disability Law Center.  She has earned a Master of Divinity from Weston Jesuit School of Theology and a Juris Doctor from UCLA School of Law.  She was ordained a deacon in 1988.  


Deacon Dionata Rodrigues de Oliveira, Igreja Evangélica de Confissão Luterana no Brasil

Deacon Dionata Rodrigues de Oliveira, now living in Novo Hamburgo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, graduated in Theology as a specialist in Diakonia from Escola Superior de Teologia – EST (Higher School of Theology), São Leopoldo. He completed his Master in Theology/Diakonia from EST in 2019.  He is now a doctoral candidate from the same institution and employed as the Diaconal Advisor of Nordeste Gaúcho Synod.  Since 2018, he has been the Community of Deacons (COD) Coordinator IECLB – Igreja Evangélica de Confissão Luterana no Brasil.


Anita Wood, United Methodist Deacons and Diaconal Ministers

Born in England Anita pursued a career in teaching after receiving her education at Westhill College of Education, Birmingham. After teaching 5 years she and her husband moved to Ohio USA for their theological Education at The Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Anita’s theological education was interrupted by the birth of two daughters and she completed her degree at United Theological Seminary. After 21 years serving in local churches in West Ohio as Director of Education first as a Diaconal Minister and then, after the creation of the Order of Deacons in the UMC in 1996 ,as a Deacon, she accepted a position at the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church as Director of Professional Ministry Development, where she served for 12 years before retiring. Committed to the ministry of the deacon Anita now works part-time from her home in the Seattle Washington area for GBHEM in Deacon and certification in specialized ministry areas.

Anita’s experience included several positions related to General Church agencies, as a member of the board of the Commission on the Status and Role of Women, and with the General Council on Ministries. Her interests in advocacy and monitoring throughout the years equipped her as mediator and counselor in management roles.

Her responsibilities have also included guiding the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry in the preparation and presentation of proposals for legislation at the quadrennial General Conference of the United Methodist Church.


Janice Soyer-Delaney, Wesley Diaconal Community – Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas

Representative of the Wesley Diaconal Community – Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas(WDC – MCCA) to DOTAC Board.

Janice worked in the Private sector before entering the United Theological College of the West Indies(UTCWI) and the University of the West Indies(UWI), Mona, Jamaica in 1992 for training as a Minister in the MCCA. 

She was ordained as a Deacon in 1997 and has served in congregations and schools in the Caribbean Islands of Jamaica, Barbados, Grenada, St. Lucia and Tobago, in various Diaconal and Pastoral roles.  She has also served as a school chaplain.

Ministry to Children and Youth in congregations and schools has resulted in her completing a certificate in Guidance and Counseling, and her interest in developing Spirituality has led to her completing a two-year program in Spiritual Formation with the Upper Room Ministries of the UMC.

Janice has been serving on the DOTAC board since 2018.


Scott James-Vickery, The Office of Deaconess, Home Missioners and Home Missionaries-The United Methodist Church

Scott is employed by United Methodist Women of the United Methodist Church where he is an Executive for the Office of Deaconess, Home Missioner and Home Missionary which administers mission personnel throughout the United States whose focus is on service and advocacy. Prior to that he was an educator for over 15 years.  His experience in the classroom includes:  Fifth grade general education teacher, reading specialist, special education inclusion teacher and severe/profound self-contained classroom teacher.

Scott has five beautiful children, Abby, John Presley, Nikolas, Hudson and Keiara. Scott’s wife, Mollie is a United Methodist Deaconess and is the Director of Mobilization at United Methodist Women who does advocacy work for women, children and youth.

Scott has a Bachelor of Science in Business from William Carey University and a Masters Degree in Education with Concentrations in Special Education and Educational Law. Scott completed his seminary work at New York Theological Seminary and received his credentials for chaplaincy through The Jewish Theological Seminary.

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6 days ago

fyi, The DOTAC Monthly Prayer Zoom Gathering will not be on August 1 as it is a Sunday. We are moving to Monday, August 2 at 5 pm Central Daylight Time. If you are not on the list but want to join us send me an email -- teddodd@live.com -- and I can send you the link and further information. ... See MoreSee Less

fyi, The DOTAC Monthly Prayer Zoom Gathering will not be on August 1 as it is a Sunday.  We are moving to Monday, August 2 at 5 pm Central Daylight Time.  If you are not on the list but want to join us send me an email -- teddodd@live.com -- and I can send you the link and further information.
7 days ago

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Proper 13



Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665),

The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert,

Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Exodus 16: 2-4, 9-15

The whole congregation of the Israelites complained against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness.

The Israelites said to them,

“If only we had died by the hand of God in the land of Egypt,

when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread;

for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger.”

Then God said to Moses,

“I am going to rain bread from heaven for you,

and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day.

In that way I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not.

Then Moses said to Aaron,

“Say to the whole congregation of the Israelites, ‘Draw near to God,

for God has heard your complaining.’”

And as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the Israelites,

they looked toward the wilderness, and the glory of God appeared in the cloud.

God spoke to Moses and said,

“I have heard the complaining of the Israelites; say to them,

‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread;

then you shall know that I am Yahweh your God.’”

In the evening quails came up and covered the camp;

and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp.

When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance,

as fine as frost on the ground.

When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another,

“What is it?”

For they did not know what it was.

Moses said to them,

“It is the bread that God has given you to eat.

Prayer

Bread of Life and True Manna,

your people are so very human.

When we are hungry or thirsty, we often grumble and complain.

When we are lost or scared, we often murmur and whine.

When are in pain or in doubt, we often get petulant.

When are desperate and in discomfort, we demand gang up on our leaders.

Sometimes our protests are justified and our objections are legitimate.

Sometimes they are not.

In any case, your way is not to scold or judge or blame,

not to be furious or wrathful.

The way of the Holy Mystery is

teeming abundance not scarcity,

generous blessing not revenge,

gracious compassion not critique.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we may

know the intimate dynamic of the divine,

and experience your love in body, mind, and spirit.

God of Exodus and Liberation,

in the midst of the pandemics of

COVID, racism, and violence, and

the floods and fires of climate change,

we know too well the romanticizing and rationalizing of the past:

the desire to return to the “normal” of before,

the whitewashing of colonial history,

the ignoring of humanity’s environmental impact.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we might

be touched by the splendor,

be moved by the presence of gift,

be changed by the hope of connection and community.

Move us into the future in a good way.

Teach us to create new “normals” with faith and courage.

Guide us to reconciliation and right relationship.

Let us be active in fashioning a better planet.

Make us a better people.

*Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), *

*The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, *

*Musée du Louvre, Paris.*
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Proper 13

 

Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), 

The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, 

Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Exodus 16: 2-4, 9-15

The whole congregation of the Israelites complained against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness. 

The Israelites said to them, 

“If only we had died by the hand of God in the land of Egypt, 

when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; 

for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger.”

Then God said to Moses, 

“I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, 

and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day. 

In that way I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not.

Then Moses said to Aaron, 

“Say to the whole congregation of the Israelites, ‘Draw near to God, 

for God has heard your complaining.’” 

And as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the Israelites, 

they looked toward the wilderness, and the glory of God appeared in the cloud. 

God spoke to Moses and said, 

“I have heard the complaining of the Israelites; say to them, 

‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread; 

then you shall know that I am Yahweh your God.’”

In the evening quails came up and covered the camp; 

and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp. 

 When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance, 

as fine as frost on the ground. 

When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another, 

“What is it?”

For they did not know what it was. 

Moses said to them, 

“It is the bread that God has given you to eat.

Prayer

Bread of Life and True Manna,

your people are so very human.

When we are hungry or thirsty, we often grumble and complain.

When we are lost or scared, we often murmur and whine.

When are in pain or in doubt, we often get petulant.

When are desperate and in discomfort, we demand gang up on our leaders.

Sometimes our protests are justified and our objections are legitimate.

Sometimes they are not.

In any case, your way is not to scold or judge or blame,

 not to be furious or wrathful.

The way of the Holy Mystery is

 teeming abundance not scarcity,

 generous blessing not revenge,

 gracious compassion not critique. 

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we may

 know the intimate dynamic of the divine,

 and experience your love in body, mind, and spirit.

God of Exodus and Liberation,

 in the midst of the pandemics of

 COVID, racism, and violence, and

 the floods and fires of climate change,

 we know too well the romanticizing and rationalizing of the past:

 the desire to return to the “normal” of before,

 the whitewashing of colonial history,

 the ignoring of humanity’s environmental impact.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we might

 be touched by the splendor,

 be moved by the presence of gift,

 be changed by the hope of connection and community.

Move us into the future in a good way.

Teach us to create new “normals” with faith and courage.

Guide us to reconciliation and right relationship.

Let us be active in fashioning a better planet.

Make us a better people. 

*Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), *

*The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, *

*Musée du Louvre, Paris.*
1 week ago

Diaconal colleages and friends, please consider registering for the evening session. These events are sponsored by DOTAC and the World Council of Churches Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace program in partnership with Kairos. ... See MoreSee Less

Diaconal colleages and friends, please consider registering for the evening session. These events are sponsored by DOTAC and the World Council of Churches Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace program in partnership with Kairos.

Comment on Facebook

Don't think I can do it again, but highly recommend it

I look forward to participating again, fully aware each time I have participated in person, I keep learning. I look forward to experiencing the learning in a new way through the online opportunity. I am so glad it is being offered and do hope the evening session fills up!

2 weeks ago

**Sunday, July 25, 2021**

**Proper 12**



*John 6: 5-13*

When Jesus looked up and saw a large crowd coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip,

“Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?”

He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do.

Philip answered him,

“Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little.”

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him,

“There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish.

But what are they among so many people?”

Jesus said,

“Make the people sit down.”

Now there was a great deal of grass in the place; so they sat down, about five thousand in all.

Then Jesus took the loaves, and when he had given thanks,

he distributed them to those who were seated;

so also the fish, as much as they wanted.

When they were satisfied, he told his disciples,

“Gather up the fragments left over, so that nothing may be lost.”

So they gathered them up, and from the fragments of the five barley loaves,

left by those who had eaten, they filled twelve baskets

*Prayer*

Prophet Healer,

we read in our news sources

of fire and floods,

of heat waves and climate change,

and we ask, like an Andrew,

“Who are we to address such devastation?”

Miraculous Messiah,

we see on our devices, images of

brutality and racism,

unmarked burials and a legacy of grief.

We cannot breathe and we wonder,

“Who are we to take on this tragic past and unjust present?”

We are often paralyzed by the enormity of this wrong.

We are tempted to wait out the news cycle.

We can fall into the shame of inertia.

Feeder of the Five Thousand,

we hear the stories of

violence and abuse,

war and conflicts.

We question,

“In the face of so much, what can we do?”

We can be overwhelmed.

We can shut down.

We can suffer compassion fatigue.

Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes,

this pandemic seems to go on forever.

In the face of exhaustion, isolation, and loss, we sigh,

“When will this end?”

We are tempted toward impatience.

We snap with irritation.

We long for some sort of “normalcy.”

In these struggles of the faith,

we pray for your presence.

Remind us that you are the Prophetic Healer.

Teach us again that you are the Miraculous Messiah.

Show us once more that you are the Feeder of the Five Thousand.

Reveal yourself to us as the Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes.

And transform our despair into hope.

Change our “not enough” into abundance.

Turn our apathy into action.

Let us become your passionate miracle.

Surprise us with joy and thanksgiving.

Guide us to listen and learn.

Teach us to share with generosity and kindness.

Bless our efforts with vision and amazing grace,

that we might be more truly

your disciples of love in the world,

your ministers of justice-making,

your people of faith and passion.
... See MoreSee Less

**Sunday, July 25, 2021**

**Proper 12**

 

*John 6: 5-13*

When Jesus looked up and saw a large crowd coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, 

“Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?”

He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do. 

Philip answered him, 

“Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little.” 

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him, 

“There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish. 

But what are they among so many people?”

Jesus said, 

“Make the people sit down.” 

Now there was a great deal of grass in the place; so they sat down, about five thousand in all. 

Then Jesus took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, 

he distributed them to those who were seated; 

so also the fish, as much as they wanted. 

When they were satisfied, he told his disciples, 

“Gather up the fragments left over, so that nothing may be lost.”

So they gathered them up, and from the fragments of the five barley loaves, 

left by those who had eaten, they filled twelve baskets

*Prayer*

Prophet Healer,

 we read in our news sources

 of fire and floods,

 of heat waves and climate change,

and we ask, like an Andrew,

 “Who are we to address such devastation?”

Miraculous Messiah,

 we see on our devices, images of

 brutality and racism,

 unmarked burials and a legacy of grief.

We cannot breathe and we wonder,

 “Who are we to take on this tragic past and unjust present?”

We are often paralyzed by the enormity of this wrong.

We are tempted to wait out the news cycle.

We can fall into the shame of inertia.

Feeder of the Five Thousand,

 we hear the stories of 

 violence and abuse,

 war and conflicts.

We question,

 “In the face of so much, what can we do?”

We can be overwhelmed.

We can shut down.

We can suffer compassion fatigue.

Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes,

 this pandemic seems to go on forever.

In the face of exhaustion, isolation, and loss, we sigh,

 “When will this end?”

We are tempted toward impatience.

We snap with irritation.

We long for some sort of “normalcy.”

In these struggles of the faith,

we pray for your presence.

Remind us that you are the Prophetic Healer.

Teach us again that you are the Miraculous Messiah.

Show us once more that you are the Feeder of the Five Thousand.

Reveal yourself to us as the Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes.

And transform our despair into hope.

Change our “not enough” into abundance.

Turn our apathy into action.

Let us become your passionate miracle.

Surprise us with joy and thanksgiving.

Guide us to listen and learn.

Teach us to share with generosity and kindness.

Bless our efforts with vision and amazing grace,

 that we might be more truly 

your disciples of love in the world,

 your ministers of justice-making,

 your people of faith and passion.

Comment on Facebook

Love your lectionary poem meditations!!

Thanks for this John 6 meditation.

Thank you brother please pray for Indonesia

I’ve seen this mosaic in person, in the Holy Land!

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