Anglican Deacons Canada/Angli-Diacres Canada (ADC)

Founded in 2000, Anglican Deacons Canada/Angli-Diacres Canada was a response to the increasing number of Deacons in Canada and the sense that an association was needed which would be centred on Canadian Anglican practice and concerns.

Since that time, ADC has held triennial conferences, the last of which was in Victoria, B.C. in 2017 and the next will be at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario in June of 2020 with the theme “Deacons in Community”.

The organization is led by a Board of Directors, representing all the Ecclesiastical Provinces of the Anglican Church in Canada; elections are held at each Triennial Conference.  Currently, membership includes 84 individuals and 13 dioceses.

ADC Vision: Deacons, by the stirring of the Holy Spirit, proclaim the inclusive and challenging love of God in Christ through action, prayer, and prophetic story to enable the Kingdom to be realized in the world.

ADC Values: The Diaconate is a different and equal order within the Anglican Church called to respond to the “needs, hopes and concerns of the world to the church”.

ADC:

  • Supports: aspirants, postulants, and Deacons through education and relationship.
  • Educates:  provides information and opportunities for accessible training and continuing education.
  • Advocates:  for systemic change and reconciliation locally and globally through prophetic action, education and prayer.  
  • Communication:  Facebook, Website, email and Salt and Light Newsletter.

https://www.anglicandeacons.ca/

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6 days ago

fyi, The DOTAC Monthly Prayer Zoom Gathering will not be on August 1 as it is a Sunday. We are moving to Monday, August 2 at 5 pm Central Daylight Time. If you are not on the list but want to join us send me an email -- teddodd@live.com -- and I can send you the link and further information. ... See MoreSee Less

fyi, The DOTAC Monthly Prayer Zoom Gathering will not be on August 1 as it is a Sunday.  We are moving to Monday, August 2 at 5 pm Central Daylight Time.  If you are not on the list but want to join us send me an email -- teddodd@live.com -- and I can send you the link and further information.
7 days ago

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Proper 13



Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665),

The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert,

Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Exodus 16: 2-4, 9-15

The whole congregation of the Israelites complained against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness.

The Israelites said to them,

“If only we had died by the hand of God in the land of Egypt,

when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread;

for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger.”

Then God said to Moses,

“I am going to rain bread from heaven for you,

and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day.

In that way I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not.

Then Moses said to Aaron,

“Say to the whole congregation of the Israelites, ‘Draw near to God,

for God has heard your complaining.’”

And as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the Israelites,

they looked toward the wilderness, and the glory of God appeared in the cloud.

God spoke to Moses and said,

“I have heard the complaining of the Israelites; say to them,

‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread;

then you shall know that I am Yahweh your God.’”

In the evening quails came up and covered the camp;

and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp.

When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance,

as fine as frost on the ground.

When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another,

“What is it?”

For they did not know what it was.

Moses said to them,

“It is the bread that God has given you to eat.

Prayer

Bread of Life and True Manna,

your people are so very human.

When we are hungry or thirsty, we often grumble and complain.

When we are lost or scared, we often murmur and whine.

When are in pain or in doubt, we often get petulant.

When are desperate and in discomfort, we demand gang up on our leaders.

Sometimes our protests are justified and our objections are legitimate.

Sometimes they are not.

In any case, your way is not to scold or judge or blame,

not to be furious or wrathful.

The way of the Holy Mystery is

teeming abundance not scarcity,

generous blessing not revenge,

gracious compassion not critique.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we may

know the intimate dynamic of the divine,

and experience your love in body, mind, and spirit.

God of Exodus and Liberation,

in the midst of the pandemics of

COVID, racism, and violence, and

the floods and fires of climate change,

we know too well the romanticizing and rationalizing of the past:

the desire to return to the “normal” of before,

the whitewashing of colonial history,

the ignoring of humanity’s environmental impact.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we might

be touched by the splendor,

be moved by the presence of gift,

be changed by the hope of connection and community.

Move us into the future in a good way.

Teach us to create new “normals” with faith and courage.

Guide us to reconciliation and right relationship.

Let us be active in fashioning a better planet.

Make us a better people.

*Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), *

*The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, *

*Musée du Louvre, Paris.*
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Proper 13

 

Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), 

The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, 

Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Exodus 16: 2-4, 9-15

The whole congregation of the Israelites complained against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness. 

The Israelites said to them, 

“If only we had died by the hand of God in the land of Egypt, 

when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; 

for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger.”

Then God said to Moses, 

“I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, 

and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day. 

In that way I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not.

Then Moses said to Aaron, 

“Say to the whole congregation of the Israelites, ‘Draw near to God, 

for God has heard your complaining.’” 

And as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the Israelites, 

they looked toward the wilderness, and the glory of God appeared in the cloud. 

God spoke to Moses and said, 

“I have heard the complaining of the Israelites; say to them, 

‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread; 

then you shall know that I am Yahweh your God.’”

In the evening quails came up and covered the camp; 

and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp. 

 When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance, 

as fine as frost on the ground. 

When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another, 

“What is it?”

For they did not know what it was. 

Moses said to them, 

“It is the bread that God has given you to eat.

Prayer

Bread of Life and True Manna,

your people are so very human.

When we are hungry or thirsty, we often grumble and complain.

When we are lost or scared, we often murmur and whine.

When are in pain or in doubt, we often get petulant.

When are desperate and in discomfort, we demand gang up on our leaders.

Sometimes our protests are justified and our objections are legitimate.

Sometimes they are not.

In any case, your way is not to scold or judge or blame,

 not to be furious or wrathful.

The way of the Holy Mystery is

 teeming abundance not scarcity,

 generous blessing not revenge,

 gracious compassion not critique. 

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we may

 know the intimate dynamic of the divine,

 and experience your love in body, mind, and spirit.

God of Exodus and Liberation,

 in the midst of the pandemics of

 COVID, racism, and violence, and

 the floods and fires of climate change,

 we know too well the romanticizing and rationalizing of the past:

 the desire to return to the “normal” of before,

 the whitewashing of colonial history,

 the ignoring of humanity’s environmental impact.

Assemble us.

Have us draw near, that we might

 be touched by the splendor,

 be moved by the presence of gift,

 be changed by the hope of connection and community.

Move us into the future in a good way.

Teach us to create new “normals” with faith and courage.

Guide us to reconciliation and right relationship.

Let us be active in fashioning a better planet.

Make us a better people. 

*Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665), *

*The Israelites Gathering the Manna in the Desert, *

*Musée du Louvre, Paris.*
1 week ago

Diaconal colleages and friends, please consider registering for the evening session. These events are sponsored by DOTAC and the World Council of Churches Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace program in partnership with Kairos. ... See MoreSee Less

Diaconal colleages and friends, please consider registering for the evening session. These events are sponsored by DOTAC and the World Council of Churches Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace program in partnership with Kairos.

Comment on Facebook

Don't think I can do it again, but highly recommend it

I look forward to participating again, fully aware each time I have participated in person, I keep learning. I look forward to experiencing the learning in a new way through the online opportunity. I am so glad it is being offered and do hope the evening session fills up!

2 weeks ago

**Sunday, July 25, 2021**

**Proper 12**



*John 6: 5-13*

When Jesus looked up and saw a large crowd coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip,

“Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?”

He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do.

Philip answered him,

“Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little.”

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him,

“There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish.

But what are they among so many people?”

Jesus said,

“Make the people sit down.”

Now there was a great deal of grass in the place; so they sat down, about five thousand in all.

Then Jesus took the loaves, and when he had given thanks,

he distributed them to those who were seated;

so also the fish, as much as they wanted.

When they were satisfied, he told his disciples,

“Gather up the fragments left over, so that nothing may be lost.”

So they gathered them up, and from the fragments of the five barley loaves,

left by those who had eaten, they filled twelve baskets

*Prayer*

Prophet Healer,

we read in our news sources

of fire and floods,

of heat waves and climate change,

and we ask, like an Andrew,

“Who are we to address such devastation?”

Miraculous Messiah,

we see on our devices, images of

brutality and racism,

unmarked burials and a legacy of grief.

We cannot breathe and we wonder,

“Who are we to take on this tragic past and unjust present?”

We are often paralyzed by the enormity of this wrong.

We are tempted to wait out the news cycle.

We can fall into the shame of inertia.

Feeder of the Five Thousand,

we hear the stories of

violence and abuse,

war and conflicts.

We question,

“In the face of so much, what can we do?”

We can be overwhelmed.

We can shut down.

We can suffer compassion fatigue.

Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes,

this pandemic seems to go on forever.

In the face of exhaustion, isolation, and loss, we sigh,

“When will this end?”

We are tempted toward impatience.

We snap with irritation.

We long for some sort of “normalcy.”

In these struggles of the faith,

we pray for your presence.

Remind us that you are the Prophetic Healer.

Teach us again that you are the Miraculous Messiah.

Show us once more that you are the Feeder of the Five Thousand.

Reveal yourself to us as the Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes.

And transform our despair into hope.

Change our “not enough” into abundance.

Turn our apathy into action.

Let us become your passionate miracle.

Surprise us with joy and thanksgiving.

Guide us to listen and learn.

Teach us to share with generosity and kindness.

Bless our efforts with vision and amazing grace,

that we might be more truly

your disciples of love in the world,

your ministers of justice-making,

your people of faith and passion.
... See MoreSee Less

**Sunday, July 25, 2021**

**Proper 12**

 

*John 6: 5-13*

When Jesus looked up and saw a large crowd coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, 

“Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?”

He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do. 

Philip answered him, 

“Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little.” 

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him, 

“There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish. 

But what are they among so many people?”

Jesus said, 

“Make the people sit down.” 

Now there was a great deal of grass in the place; so they sat down, about five thousand in all. 

Then Jesus took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, 

he distributed them to those who were seated; 

so also the fish, as much as they wanted. 

When they were satisfied, he told his disciples, 

“Gather up the fragments left over, so that nothing may be lost.”

So they gathered them up, and from the fragments of the five barley loaves, 

left by those who had eaten, they filled twelve baskets

*Prayer*

Prophet Healer,

 we read in our news sources

 of fire and floods,

 of heat waves and climate change,

and we ask, like an Andrew,

 “Who are we to address such devastation?”

Miraculous Messiah,

 we see on our devices, images of

 brutality and racism,

 unmarked burials and a legacy of grief.

We cannot breathe and we wonder,

 “Who are we to take on this tragic past and unjust present?”

We are often paralyzed by the enormity of this wrong.

We are tempted to wait out the news cycle.

We can fall into the shame of inertia.

Feeder of the Five Thousand,

 we hear the stories of 

 violence and abuse,

 war and conflicts.

We question,

 “In the face of so much, what can we do?”

We can be overwhelmed.

We can shut down.

We can suffer compassion fatigue.

Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes,

 this pandemic seems to go on forever.

In the face of exhaustion, isolation, and loss, we sigh,

 “When will this end?”

We are tempted toward impatience.

We snap with irritation.

We long for some sort of “normalcy.”

In these struggles of the faith,

we pray for your presence.

Remind us that you are the Prophetic Healer.

Teach us again that you are the Miraculous Messiah.

Show us once more that you are the Feeder of the Five Thousand.

Reveal yourself to us as the Multiplier of the Loaves and Fishes.

And transform our despair into hope.

Change our “not enough” into abundance.

Turn our apathy into action.

Let us become your passionate miracle.

Surprise us with joy and thanksgiving.

Guide us to listen and learn.

Teach us to share with generosity and kindness.

Bless our efforts with vision and amazing grace,

 that we might be more truly 

your disciples of love in the world,

 your ministers of justice-making,

 your people of faith and passion.

Comment on Facebook

Love your lectionary poem meditations!!

Thanks for this John 6 meditation.

Thank you brother please pray for Indonesia

I’ve seen this mosaic in person, in the Holy Land!

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